30 Days hands-on with VMTurbo’s OpsMan #VFD3

Stick figure man wants his application to run faster. #WhiteboardGlory courtesy of VM Turbo's Yuri Rabover

Stick figure man wants his application to run faster. #WhiteboardGlory courtesy of VM Turbo’s Yuri Rabover

So you may recall that back in March, yours truly, Parent Partition, was invited as a delegate to a Tech Field Day event, specifically Virtualization Field Day #3, put on by the excellent team at Gestalt IT especially for the guys guys who like V.

And you may recall further that as I diligently blogged the news and views to you, that by day 3, I was getting tired and grumpy. Wear leveling algorithms intended to prevent failure could no longer cope with all this random tech field day IO, hot spots were beginning to show in the parent partition and the resource exhaustion section of the Windows event viewer, well, she was blinking red.

And so, into this pity-party I was throwing for myself walked a Russian named Yuri, a Dr. named Schmuel and a product called a “VMTurbo” as well as a Macbook that like all Mac products, wouldn’t play nice with the projector.

You can and should read all about what happened next because 1) VMTurbo is an interesting product and I worked hard on the piece, and 2) it’s one of the most popular posts on my little blog.

Now the great thing about VMTurbo OpsMan & Yuri & Dr. Schmuel’s presentation wasn’t just that it played into my fevered fantasies of being a virtualization economics czar (though it did), or that it promised to bridge the divide via reporting between Infrastructure guys like me and the CFO & corner office finance people (though it can), or that it had lots of cool graphs, sliders, knobs and other GUI candy (though it does).

No, the great thing about VMTurbo OpsMan & Yuri & Dr. Schmuel’s presentation was that they said it would work with that other great Type 1 Hypervisor, a Type-1 Hypervisor I’m rather fond of: Microsoft’s Hyper-V.

I didn't even make screenshots for this review, so suffer through the annotated .pngs from VMTurbo's website and imagine it's my stack

I didn’t even make screenshots for this review, so suffer through the annotated .pngs from VMTurbo’s website and imagine it’s my stack

And so in the last four or five weeks of my employment with Previous Employer (PE), I had the opportunity to test these claims, not in a lab environment, but against the stack I had built, cared for, upgraded, and worried about for four years.

That’s right baby. I put VMTurbo’s economics engine up against my six node Hyper-V cluster in PE’s primary datacenter, a rationalized but aging cluster with two iSCSI storage arrays, a 6509E, and 70+ virtual machines.

Who’s the better engineer? Me, or the Boston appliance designed by a Russian named Yuri and a Dr. named Schmuel? 

Here’s what I found.

The Good

  • Thinking economically isn’t just part of the pitch: VMTurbo’s sales reps, sales engineers and product managers, several of whom I spoke with during the implementation, really believe this stuff. Just about everyone I worked with stood up to my barrage of excited-but-serious questioning and could speak literately to VMTurbo’s producer/consumer model, this resource-buys-from-that-resource idea, the virtualized datacenter as a market analogy. The company even sends out Adam Smith-themed emails (Famous economist…wrote the Wealth of Nations if you’re not aware). If your infrastructure and budget are similar to what mine were at PE, if you stress over managing virtualization infrastructure, if you fold paper again and again like I did, VMTurbo gets you.
  • Installation of the appliance was easy: Install process was simple: download a zipped .vhd (not .vhdx), either deploy it via VMM template or put the VHD into a CSV and import it, connnect it to your VM network, and start it up. The appliance was hassle-free as a VM; it’s running Suse Linux, and quite a bit of java code from what I could tell, but for you, it’s packaged up into a nice http:// site, and all you have to do is pop in the 30 day license XML key.
  • It was insightful, peering into the stack from top to nearly the bottom and delivering solid APM:  After I got the product working, I immediately made the VMturbo guys help me designate a total of about 10 virtual machines, two executables, the SQL instances supporting those .exes and more resources as Mission Critical. The applications & the terminal services VMs they run on are pounded 24 hours a day, six days a week by 200-300 users. Telling VMTurbo to adjust its recommendations in light of this application infrastructure wasn’t simple, but it wasn’t very difficult either. That I finally got something to view the stack in this way put a bounce in my step and a feather in my cap in the closing days of my time with PE. With VMTurbo, my former colleagues on the help desk could answer “Why is it slow?!?!” and I think that’s great.
  • Like mom, it points out flaws, records your mistakes and even puts a $$ on them, which was embarrassing yet illuminating: I was measured by this appliance and found wanting. VMTurbo, after watching the stack for a good two weeks, surprisingly told me I had overprovisioned -by two- virtual CPUs on a secondary SQL server. It recommended I turn off that SQL box (yes, yes, we in Hyper-V land can’t hot-unplug vCPU yet, Save it VMware fans!) and subtract two virtual CPUs. It even (and I didn’t have time to figure out how it calculated this) said my over-provisioning cost about $1200. Yikes.
  • It’s agent-less: And the Windows guys reading this just breathed a sigh of relief. But hold your golf clap…there’s color around this from a Hyper-V perspective I’ll get into below. For now, know this: VMTurbo knocked my socks off with its superb grasp & use of WMI. I love Windows Management Instrumentation, but VMTurbo takes WMI to a level I hadn’t thought of, querying the stack frequently, aggregating and massaging the results, and spitting out its models. This thing takes WMI and does real math against the results, math and pivots even an Excel jockey could appreciate. One of the VMTurbo product managers I worked with told me that they’d like to use Powershell, but powershell queries were still to slow whereas WMI could be queried rapidly.
  • It produces great reports I could never quite build in SCOM: By the end of day two, I had PDFs on CPU, Storage & network bandwidth consumption, top consumers, projections, and a good sense of current state vs desired state. Of course you can automate report creation and deliver via email etc. In the old days it was hard to get simple reports on CSV space free/space used; VMTurbo needed no special configuration to see how much space was left in a CSV
  • vFeng Shui for your virtual datacenter

    vFeng Shui for your virtual datacenter

    Integrates with AD: Expected. No surprises.

  • It’s low impact: I gave the VM 3 CPU and 16GB of RAM. The .vhd was about 30 gigabytes. Unlike SCOM, no worries here about the Observer Effect (always loved it when SCOM & its disk-intensive SQL back-end would report high load on a LUN that, you guessed it, was attached to the SCOM VM).
  • A Eureka! style moment: A software developer I showed the product to immediately got the concept. Viewing infrastructure as a supply chain, the heat map showing current state and desired state, these were things immediately familiar to him, and as he builds software products for PE, I considered that good insight. VMTurbo may not be your traditional operations manager, but it can assist you in translating your infrastructure into terms & concepts the business understands intuitively.
  • I was comfortable with its recommendations: During #VFD3, there was some animated discussion around flipping the VMTurbo switch from a “Hey! Virtualization engineer, you should do this,” to a “VMTurbo Optimize Automagically!” mode. But after watching it for a few weeks, after putting the APM together, I watched its recommendations closely. Didn’t flip the switch but it’s there. And that’s cool.
  • You can set it against your employer’s month end schedule: Didn’t catch a lot of how to do this, but you can give VMTurbo context. If it’s the end of the month, maybe you’ll see increased utilization of your finance systems. You can model peaks and troughs in the business cycle and (I think) it will adjust recommendations accordingly ahead of time.
  • Cost: Getting sensitive here but I will say this: it wasn’t outrageous. It hit the budget we had. Cost is by socket. It was a doable figure. Purchase is up to my PE, but I think VMTurbo worked well for PE’s particular infrastructure and circumstances.

The Bad:

  • No sugar coating it here, this thing’s built for VMware: All vendors please take note. If VMware, nomenclature is “vCPU, vMem, vNIC, Datastore, vMotion” If Hyper-V, nomenclature is “VM CPU, VM Mem, VMNic, Cluster Shared Volume (or CSV), Live Migration.” Should be simple enough to change or give us 29%ers a toggle. Still works, but annoying to see Datastore everywhere.
  • Interface is all flash: It’s like Adobe barfed all over the user interface. Mostly hassle-free, but occasionally a change you expected to register on screen took a manual refresh to become visible. Minor complaint.
  • Doesn’t speak SMB 3.0 yet: A conversation with one product engineer more or less took the route it usually takes. “SMB 3? You mean CIFS?” Sigh. But not enough to scuttle the product for Hyper-V shops…yet. If they still don’t know what SMB 3 is in two years…well I do declare I’d be highly offended. For now, if they want to take Hyper-V seriously as their website says they do, VMTurbo should focus some dev efforts on SMB 3 as it’s a transformative file storage tech, a few steps beyond what NFS can do. EMC called it the future of storage!
  • VFD-Logo-400x398Didn’t talk to my storage: There is visibility down to the platter from an APM perspective, but this wasn’t in scope for the trial we engaged in. Our filer had direct support, our Nimble, as a newer storage platform, did not. So IOPS weren’t part of the APM calculations, though free/used space was.

The Ugly:

  • Trusted Install & taking ownership of reg keys is required: So remember how I said VMTurbo was agent-less, using WMI in an ingenious way to gather its data from VMs and hosts alike? Well, yeah, about that. For Hyper-V and Windows shops who are at all current (2012 or R2, as well as 2008 R2), this means provisioning a service account with sufficient permissions, taking ownership of two Reg keys away from Trusted Installer (a very important ‘user’) in HKLM\CLSID and one further down in WOW64, and assigning full control permissions to the service account on the reg key. This was painful for me, no doubt, and I hesitated for a good week. In the end, Trusted Installer still keeps full-control, so it’s a benign change, and I think payoff is worth it. A Senior VMTurbo product engineer told me VMTurbo is working with Microsoft to query WMI without making the customer modify the registry, but as of now, this is required. And the Group Policy I built to do this for me didn’t work entirely. On 2008 R2 VMs, you only have to modify the one CLSID key

Soup to nuts, I left PE pretty impressed with VMTurbo. I’m not joking when I say it probably could optimize my former virtualized environment better than I could. And it can do it around the clock, unlike me, even when I’m jacked up on 5 Hour Energy or a triple-shot espresso with house music on in the background.

vmturboStepping back and thinking of the concept here and divesting myself from the pain of install in a Hyper-V context: products like this are the future of IT. VMTurbo is awesome and unique in an on-prem context as it bridges the gap between cost & operations, but it’s also kind of a window into our future as IT pros

That’s because if your employer is cloud-focused at all, the infrastructure-as-market-economy model is going to be in your future, like it or not. Cloud compute/storage/network, to a large extent, is all about supply, demand, consumption, production and bursting of resources against your OpEx budget.

What’s neat about VMTurbo is not just that it’s going to help you get the most out of the CapEx you spent on your gear, but also that it helps you shift your thinking a bit, away from up/down, latency, and login times to a rationalized economic model you’ll need in the years ahead.


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30 Days hands-on with VMTurbo’s OpsMan #VFD3 — 3 Comments

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  2. Pingback: Newsletter: June 15, 2014 | Notes from MWhite

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