It’s been awhile since I posted about my home lab, Daisettalabs.net, but rest assured, though I’ve been largely radio silent on it, I’ve been busy.

If 2013 saw the birth of Daisetta Labs.net, 2014 was akin to the terrible twos, with some joy & victories mixed together with teething pains and bruising.

So what’s 2015 shaping up to be?

Well, if I had to characterize it, I’d say it’s #LabGlory, through and through. Honestly. Why?

I’ve assembled a home lab that’s capable of simulating just about anything I run into in the ‘wild’ as a professional. And that’s always been the goal with my lab: practicing technology at home so that I can excel at work.

Let’s have a look at the state of the lab, shall we?

Hardware & Software

Daisetta Labs.net 2015 is comprised of the following:

  • Five (5) physical servers
  • 136 GB RAM
  • Sixteen (16) non-HT Cores
  • One (1) wireless access point
  • One (1) zone-based Firewall
  • Two (2) multilayer gigabit switches
  • One (1) Cable modem in bridge mode
  • Two (2) Public IPs (DHCP)
  • One (1) Silicon Dust HD
  • Ten (10) VLANs
  • Thirteen (13) VMs
  • Five (5) Port-Channels
  • One (1) Windows Media Center PC

That’s quite a bit of kit, as a former British colleague used to say. What’s it all do? Let’s dive in:

Physical Layout

The bulk of my lab gear is in my garage on a wooden workbench.

Nodes 2-4, the core switch, my Zywall edge device, modem, TV tuner, Silicon Dust device and Ooma phone all reside in a secured 12U, two post rack I picked up on ebay about two years ago for $40. One other server, core.daisettalabs.net, sits inside a mid-tower case stuffed with nine 2TB Hitachi HDDs and five 256GB SSDs below the rack.

Placing my lab in the garage has a few benefits, chief among them: I don’t hear (as many) complaints from the family cluster about noise. Also, because it’s largely in the garage, it’s isolated & out of reach of the Child Partition’s curious fingers, which, as every parent knows, are attracted to buttons of all types.

Power & Thermal

Of course you can’t build a lab at home without reliable power, so I’ve got one rack-mounted APC UPS, and one consumer-grade Cyberpower UPS for core.daisettalabs.net and all the internet gear.

On average, the lab gear in the garage consumes about 346 watts, or about 3 amps. That’s significant, no doubt, costing me about $38/month to power, or about 2/3rds the cost of a subscription to IT Pro TV or Pluralsight. 🙂

Thermals are a big challenge. My house was built in 1967, has decent insulation and holds temperature fairly well in the habitable parts of the space. But none of that is true about the garage, where my USB lab thermometer has recorded temps as low as 3C last winter and as high as 39c in Summer 2014. That’s air-temperature at the top of the rack, mind you, not at the CPU.

One of my goals for this year is to automate the shutdown/powerup of all node servers in the Garage based on the temperature reading of the USB thermometer. The $25 thermometer is something I picked up on Amazon awhile ago; it outputs to .csv but I haven’t figured out how to automate its software interface with powershell….yet.

Anyway, here’s my stack, all stickered up and ready for review:

IMG_20150329_214535914

Beyond the garage, the Daisetta Lab extends to my home’s main hallway, the living room, and of course, my home office.

Here’s the layout:

homelab2015

Compute

On the compute side of things, it’s almost all Haswell with the exception of core and node3:

[table]

Server, Architecture, CPU, Cores, RAM, Function, OS, Motherboard

Core, AMD A-series, A8-5500, 2, 8GB, Tiered Storage Spaces & DC/DHCP/DNS, Server 2012 R2, Gigabyte D4

Node1, Haswell, i7-4770k, 4, 32GB, Main PC/Office/VM host/storage, 2012R2, Supermicro X10SAT

Node2, Haswell, Xeon E3-1241, 4, 32GB, Cluster node, 2012r2 core, Supermicro X10SAF

Node3, Ivy Bridge, i7-2600, 4, 32GB, Cluster node, 2012r2 core, Biostar

Node4, Haswell, i5-4670, 4, 32GB, Cluster node/storage, 2012r2 core, Asus

[/table]

I love Haswell for its speed, thermal properties and affordability, but damn! That’s a lot of boxes, isn’t it? Unfortunately, you just can’t get very VM dense when 32GB is the max amount of RAM Haswell E3/i7 chipsets support. I love dynamic RAM on a VM as much as the next guy, but even with Windows core, it’s been hard to squeeze more than 8-10 VMs on a single host. With Hyper-V Containers coming, who knows, maybe that will change?

Node1, the pride of the fleet and my main productivity machine, boasting 2x850 Pro SSDs in RAID 0, an AMD FirePro, and Tiered Storage Spaces
Node1, the pride of the fleet and my main productivity machine, boasting 2×850 Pro SSDs in RAID 0, an AMD FirePro, and Tiered Storage Spaces

While I included it in the diagram, TVPC3 is not really a lab machine. It’s a cheap Ivy Bridge Pentium with 8GB of RAM and 3TB of local storage. It’s sole function in life is to decrypt the HD stream it receives from the Silicon Dust tuner and display HGTV for my mother-in-law with as little friction as possible. Running Windows 8.1 with Media Center, it’s the only PC in the house without battery backup.

Physical Network
About 18 months ago, I poured gallons of sweat equity into cabling my house. I ran at least a dozen CAT-5e cables from the garage to my home office, bedrooms, living room and to some external parts of the house for video surveillance.
I don’t regret it in the least; nothing like having a reliable, physical backbone to connect up your home network/lab environment!

Meet my underlay
Meet my underlay

At the core of the physical network lies my venerable Cisco 2960S-48TS-L switch. Switch1 may be a humble access-layer switch, but in my lab, the 2960S bundles 17 ports into five port channels, serves as my DG, routes with some rudimentary Layer 3 functions ((Up to 16 static routes, no dynamic route features are available)) and segments 9 VLANs and one port-security VLAN, a feature that’s akin to PVLAN.

Switch2 is a 10 port Cisco Small Business SG-300 running at Layer 3 and connected to Switch1 via a 2-port port-channel. I use a few ports on switch2 for the TV and an IP cam.

On the edge is redzed.daisettalabs.net, the Zyxel USG-50, which I wrote about last month.

Connecting this kit up to the internet is my Motorola Surfboard router/modem/switch/AP, which I run in bridge mode. The great thing about this device and my cable service is that for some reason, up to two LAN ports can be active at any given time. This means that CableCo gives me two public, DHCP addresses, simultaneously. One of these goes into a WAN port on the Zyxel, and the other goes into a downed switchport

Love Meraki's RF Spectrum chart!
Love Meraki’s RF Spectrum chart!

Lastly, there’s my Meraki MR-16, an access point a friend and Ubiquity networks fan gave me. Though it’s a bit underpowered for my tastes, I love this device. The MR-16 is trunked to switch1 and connects via an 802.3af power injector. I announce two SSIDs off the Meraki, both secured with WPA2 Personal ((WPA2 Enterprise is on the agenda this year)). Depending on which SSID you connect to, you’ll end up on the Device or VM VLANs.

Virtual Network

The virtual network was built entirely in System Center VMM 2012 R2. Nothing too fancy here, with multiple Gigabit adapters per physical host, one converged logical vSwitch and a separate NIC on each host fronting for the DMZ network:

Nodes 1, 2 & 4 are all Haswell, and are clustered. Node3 is standalone.

Thanks to VMM, building this out is largely a breeze, once you’ve settled on an architecture. I like to run the cmdlets to build the virtual & logical networks myself, but there’s also a great script available that will build a converged network for you.

A physical host typically looks like this (I say typically because I don’t have an equal number of adapters in all hosts):

I trust VLANs and VMM's segmentation abilities, but chose to build what is in effect air-gapped vSwitch for the DMZ/DIA networks
I trust VLANs and VMM’s segmentation abilities, but chose to build what is in effect air-gapped vSwitch for the DMZ/DIA networks

We’re already several levels deep in my personal abstraction cave, why stop here? Here’s the layout of VM Networks, which are distinguished from but related to logical networks in VMM:

labnet13

I get a lot of questions on this blog about jumbo frames and Hyper-V switching, and I just want to reiterate that it’s not that hard to do, and look, here’s proof:

jumbopacket

Good stuff!

Storage

And last, and certainly most-interestingly, we arrive at Daisetta Lab’s storage resources.

My lab journey began with storage testing, in particular ZFS via NexentaCore (Illumos), NAS4Free and Solaris 11. But that’s ancient history; since last summer, I’ve been all Windows, all the time in my lab, starting with SAN.Daisettalabs.net ((cf #StorageGlory : 30 Days on a Windows SAN)).

Now?

Well, I had so much fun -and importantly so few failures/pains- with Microsoft’s Tiered Storage Spaces that I’ve decided to deploy not one, or even two, but three Tiered Storage Spaces. Here’s the layout:

[table]Server, #HDD, #SSD, StoragePool Capacity, StoragePool Free, #vDisks, Function

Core, 9, 6, 16.7TB, 12.7TB, 6 So far, SMB3/iSCSI target for entire lab

Node1,2, 2, 2.05TB, 1.15TB,2, SMB3 target for Hyper-V replication

Node4,3,1, 2.86TB, 1.97TB,2, SMB3 target for Hyper-V replication

[/table]

I have to say, I continue to be very impressed with Tiered Storage Spaces. It’s super-flexible, the cmdlets are well-documented, and Microsoft is iterating on it rapidly. More on the performance of Tiered Storage Spaces in a subsequent post.

Thanks for reading!

Snover re-factoring Windows Server & System Center

My last two posts on Microsoft were filled with angst and despair at Microsoft’s announcement that the next gen versions of Server & System Center would be delayed until sometime in 2016. Why, I cried out, why the delay on Server, and what’s to become of my System Center, I wondered?

I went a bit off-the-rails, imagining that Satya Nadella had shaken things up for the System Center team. Then I wrote a letter to him asking him what was up.

Snover & Microsoft love Linux
Snover & Microsoft love Linux

Well, I was wrong on all that, or perhaps I was only a little bit right.

There was a shakeup, but it wasn’t Nadella who had angrily overturned a gigantic redwood table at System Center HQ, spilling Visio shapes & System Center management packs as he did so, rather it was Mr Windows himself, the Most Distinguished of Distinguished Technical Fellows, Dr. Jeffrey Snover who had shaken things up.

Yes. The Padre of Powershell himself filled in the gaps for me on why System Center & Windows Server were delayed during a TechDays online one day after my last post.

During that  talk, he announced that the Windows Server Team has been meshed with the System Center Team and, even better, the Azure team. Hot dog.

Redmond mag:

[Snover] explained that the System Center team and the Windows Server team are now “a single organization,” with common planning and scheduling. He said that the integration of the two formerly separate organizations isn’t 100 percent, but it’s better than it’s been in the past. The team also takes advantage of joint development efforts with the Microsoft Azure team, he added.

That’s outstanding news in my view.

Microsoft’s private|hybrid|public cloud story is second to none as far as I’m concerned. No one else offers deep integration between cutting edge public cloud systems (Azure) with your on-prem legacy infrastructure stack.

Yet that deep integration (not speaking of AAD Sync & ADFS 3 here) was becoming confused and muddled with overlap between the older tools (System Center) and the newer tools like Desired State Configuration, mixed in with AzurePack, an on-prem/cloud management engine.

It sounds to me like Snover’s going to put together a coherent strategy using all the tools, and I can’t think of a better guy to do the job.

But what of Windows server?

It’s getting Snovered too, but in a way that’s not as clear to me. Again, Redmond mag:

The next Windows Server product will be deeply refactored for cloud scenarios. It will have just the components for that and nothing else, Snover explained. Next, on top of that, Microsoft plans to build a server that will be the same as the Windows Servers that organizations currently use. This server it will have two application profiles. One of the application profiles will target the existing APIs for Windows Server, while the other will target the subsets of the APIs that are cloud optimized, Snover explained. On top of the server, it will be possible to install a client, he added. This redesign is happening to better support automation, he explained.

I watched most of Snover’s talk, took a few days to think about it, and still have no idea what to make of the high-level architecture slide below that flashed on screen briefly:

vnext

Some thoughts that ran through my head: is the cloud-optimized server akin to CoreOS, with active/passive boot partitions, something that will finally make Patch Tuesday obsolete? One could hope that with further abstraction, we’ll get something like that in Windows Server vNext.

In some sense, we already have parts of this: if you enable the Hyper-V feature on a bare-metal computer, you emerge, after a few reboots, running a Windows virtual machine atop a Type-1 Hypervisor.

Big deal right? Well, Snover’s slide seems to indicate this will be the default state for the next generation of Windows server, but more than that, it seems to indicate that what we think of as the Type-1 Hyperivisor is getting a bunch of new features, like container support.

We knew Docker support was coming, but at this level, and almost indistinguishable from the hypervisor itself?

That’s potentially all kinds of awesome.

Interestingly, Server Roles & Features look like they’re being recast into a “Client” level that operates above a Windows Server.

Which, if we continue down the rabbit hole, means we have to ask the question: If my AD Domain Controller  or my RemoteApp session host farm servers are now clients, what are they running on? It certainly doesn’t seem to be a Windows server anymore, but rather a kind agnostic compute fabric, made up of virtual “Servers” and/or “Containers” operating atop a cloud-optimized server running on bare-metal…an agnostic computing ((Damn straight, had to work that in there)) fabric that stretches across my old on-prem Dells all the way up to the Azure cloud…right?!?

I’m like four levels deep into Jeffrey Snover’s subconscious so I’ll stop, but suffice it to say, the delay of Windows Server & System Center appears to be justified and I can’t wait to start testing it in 2016.

Hyper-V + VXLAN and more from Tech Ed Europe

If you thought -as I admittedly did- that on-prem Windows Server was being left for dead on the side of the Azure road, then boy were we wrong.

Not sure where to start here, but some incredible announcements from Microsoft in Barcelona, most of which I got from Windows Server MVP reporter Aidan Finn

Among them:

  • VXLAN, NVGRE & Network Controller, courtesy of Azure: This is something I’ve hoped for in the next version of Windows Server: a more compelling SDN story, something more than Network Function Virtualization & NVGRE encapsulation. If bringing the some of the best -and widely supported- bits of the VMware ecosystem to on-prem Hyper-V & System Center isn’t a virtualization engineer’s wet dream, I don’t know what is.
  • VMware meet Azure Site Recovery: Coming soon to a datacenter near you, failover your VMware infrastructure via Azure Site Recovery, the same way Hyper-V shops can

    Not sure what to do with this yet, but gimme!
    Not sure what to do with this yet, but gimme!
  • In-place/rolling upgrades for Hyper-V Clusters: This feature was announced with the release of Windows Server Technical Preview (of course, I only read about it after I wiped out my lab 2012 R2 cluster) but there’s a lot more detail on it from TechEd via Finn:  rebuild physical nodes without evicting them first.You keep the same Cluster Name Object, simply live migrating your VMs off your targeted hosts. Killer.
  • Single cluster node failure: In the old days, I used to lose sleep over clusres.dll, or clussvc.exe, two important pieces in Microsoft Clustering technology. Sure, your VMs will failover & restart on a new host, but that’s no fun.  Ben Armstrong demonstrated how vNext handles node failure by killing the cluster service live during his presentation. Finn says the VMs didn’t failover,but the host was isolated by the other nodes and the cluster simply paused and waited for the node to recovery (up to 4 minutes). Awesome!
  • Azure Witness: Also for clustering fans who are torn (as I am) between selecting file or disk witness for clusters: you will soon be able to add mighty Azure as a witness to your on-prem cluster. Split brain fears no more!
  • More enhancements for Storage QoS: Ensure that your tenant doesn’t rob IOPS from everyone else.
  • The Windows SAN, for real: Yes, we can soon do offsite block-level replication from our on-prem Tiered Storage Spaces servers.
  • New System Center coming next year: So much to unpack here, but I’ll keep it brief. You may love System Center, you may hate it, but it’s not dead. I’m a fan of the big two: VMM, and ConfigMan. OpsMan I’ve had a love/hate relationship with. Well the news out of TechEd Europe is that System Center is still alive, but more integration with Azure + a substantial new release will debut next summer. So the VMM Technical Preview I’m running in the Daisetta Lab (which installs to C:Program FilesVMM 2012 R2 btw) is not the VMM I was looking for.

Other incredible announcements:

  • Docker, CoreOS & Azure: Integration of the market-leading container technology with Azure is apparently further along than I believed. A demo was shown that hurts my brain to think about: Azure + Docker + CoreOS, the linux OS that has two OS partitions and is fault-tolerant. Wow
  • Enhancements to Rights Management Service: Stop users from CTRL-Cing/CTRL-Ving your company’s data to Twitter
  • Audiocodes announces an on-prem device that appears to bring us one step closer to the dream: Lync for voice, O365 for the PBX, all switched out to the PSTN. I said one step closer!
  • Azure Operational Insights: I’m a fan of the Splunk model (point your firehose of data/logs/events at a server, and let it make sense of it) and it appears Azure Operational Insights is a product that will jump into that space. Screen cap from Finn

This is really exciting stuff.

Commentary

Looking back on the last few years in Microsoft’s history, one thing stands out: the painful change from the old Server 2008R2 model to the new 2012 model was worth it. All of the things I’ve raved about on this blog in Hyper-V (converged network, storage spaces etc) were just teasers -but also important architectural elements- that made the things we see announced today possible.

The overhaul* of Windows Server is paying huge dividends for Microsoft and for IT pros who can adapt & master it. Exciting times.

* unlike the Windows mobile > Windows Phone transition, which was not worth it

Containers! For Windows! Courtesy of Docker

DockerWithWindowsSrvAndLinux-1024x505 (1)

Big news yesterday for fans of agnostic cloud/on-prem computing.

Docker -the application virtualization stack that’s caught on like wildfire among the *nix set- is coming to Windows.

Yeah baby.

Mary Jo with the details:

Under the terms of the agreement announced today, the Docker Engine open source runtime for building, running and orchestrating containers will work with the next version of Windows Server. The Docker Engine for Windows Server will be developed as a Docker open source project, with Microsoft participating as an active community member. Docker Engine images for Windows Server will be available in the Docker Hub. The Docker Hub will also be integrated directly into Azure so that it is accessible through the Azure Management Portal and Azure Gallery. Microsoft also will be contributing to Docker’s open orchestration application programming interfaces (APIs).

When I first heard the news, emotion was mixed.

On the one hand, I love it. Virtualization of all flavors -OS, storage, network, and application- is where I want to be, as a blogger, at home in my lab, and professionally.

Yet, as a Windows guy (I dabble, of course), Docker was just a bit out of reach for me, even with my lab, which is 100% Windows.

On the other hand, I also remembered how dreadful it used to be to run Linux applications on Windows. Installing GTK+ Libraries on Windows isn’t fun, and the end-result often isn’t very attractive. In my world, keeping the two separate on the application & OS side/uniting them via Kerberos and/or https/rest has always been my preference.

But that’s old world thinking, ladies and gentlemen.

Because you see, this announcement from Microsoft & Docker Inc sounds deep, rich, functional. Microsoft’s going to contribute some of its Server code to the Docker folks, and the Docker crew will help build Container tech into Windows Server and Azure. I’m hopeful Docker will just be another Role in Server, and that Jeffrey Snover’s powershell cmdlets will hook deep into the Docker stuff.

This probably marks the death of App-V, which I wrote about in comparison to Docker just last month, but that’s fine with me.

Docker on Windows marks a giant step forward for Agnostic Computing…do we dare imagine a future in which our application stacks are portable? Today I’m running an application in a Docker Container on Azure, and tomorrow I move it to AWS?

Microsoft says that’s exactly the vision:

Docker is an open source engine that automates the deployment of any application as a portable, self-sufficient container that can run almost anywhere. This partnership will enable the Docker client to manage multi-container applications using both Linux and Windows containers, regardless of the hosting environment or cloud provider. This level of interoperability is what we at MS Open Tech strive to deliver through contributions to open source projects such as Docker.

Full announcement.

Microsoft releases new V2V and P2V tool

Do you smell what I smell?

Inhale it boys and girls because what you smell is the sweet aroma of VMware VMs being removed from the vSphere collective and placed into System Center & Hyper-V’s warm embrace.

Microsoft has released version three of its V2V and P2V assimilator tool:

Today we are releasing the Microsoft Virtual Machine Converter (MVMC) 3.0, a supported, freely available solution for converting VMware-based virtual machines and virtual disks to Hyper-V-based virtual machines and virtual hard disks (VHDs).

With the latest release, MVMC 3.0 adds the ability to convert a physical computer running Windows Server 2008 or above, or Windows Vista or above to a virtual machine running on a Hyper-V host (P2V).

This new functionality adds to existing features available including:

• Native Windows PowerShell capability that enables scripting and integration into IT automation workflows.
• Conversion and provisioning of Linux-based guest operating systems from VMware hosts to Hyper-V hosts.
• Conversion of offline virtual machines.
• Conversion of virtual machines from VMware vSphere 5.5, VMware vSphere 5.1, and VMware vSphere 4.1 hosts to Hyper-V virtual machines.

Download available here.

This couldn’t have come at a better time for me. At work -which is keeping me so busy I’ve been neglecting these august pages- my new Hyper-V cluster went Production in mid-September and has been running very well indeed.

But building a durable & performance-oriented virtualization platform for a small to medium enterprise is only 1/10th of the battle.

If I were a consultant, I’d have finished my job weeks ago, saying to the customer:

Right. Here you go lads: your cluster is built, your VMM & SCCM are happy, and the various automation bits ‘n bobs that make life in Modern IT Departments not only bearable, but fun, are complete

But I’m an employee, so much more remains to be done. So among many other things, I now transition from building the base of the stack to moving important workloads to it, namely:

  • Migrating and/or replacing important physical servers to the new stack
  • Shepherding dozens of important production VMs out of some legacy ESXi 5 & 4 hosts and into Hyper-V & System Center and thence onto greatness

So it’s really great to see Microsoft release a new version of its tool.

Thoughts on EVO:RAIL

So if you work in IT, and even better, if you’re in the virtualization space of IT as I am, you have to know that VMworld is happening this week.

VMworld is just about the biggest vCelebration of vTechnologies there is. Part trade-show, part pilgrimage, part vLollapalooza, VMworld is where all the sexy new vProducts are announced by VMware, makers of ESXi, vSphere, vCenter, and so many other vThings.

It’s an awesome show…think MacWorld at the height of Steve Jobs but with fewer hipsters and way more virtualization engineers. Awesome.

And I’ve never been :sadface:

And 2014’s VMworld was a doozy. You see, the vGiant announced a new 2U, four node vSphere & vSAN cluster-in-a-box hardware device called EVO:RAIL. I’ve been reading all about EVO:RAIL for the last two days and here’s what I think as your loyal Hyper-V blogger:

  • What’s in a name? Right off the bat, I was struck by the name for this appliance. EVO:RAIL…say what? What’s VMware trying to get across here? Am I to associate EVO with the fast Mitsubishi Lancers of my youth, or is this EVO in the more Manga/Anime sense of the word? Taken together, EVO:RAIL also calls to mind sci-fi, does it not? You could picture Lt. Cmdr Data talking about an EVO:RAIL to Cmdr Riker, as in “The Romulan bird of prey is outfitted with four EVO:RAIL phase cannons, against which the Enterprise’s shields stand no chance.” Speaking of guns: I also thought of the US Navy’s Railguns; long range kinetic weapons designed to destroy the Nutanix/Simplivity the enemy.
  • If you’re selling an appliance, do you need vExperts? One thing that struck me about VMware’s introduction of EVO:RAIL was their emphasis on how simple it is to rack, stack, install, deploy and virtualize. They claim the “hyper-converged” 2U box can be up and running in about 15 minutes; a full rack of these babies could be computing for you in less than 2 hours. evo1They’ve built a sexy HTML 5 GUI to manage the thing, no vSphere console or PowerCLI in sight. It’s all pre-baked, pre-configured, and pre-built for you, the small-to-medium enterprise. It’s so simple a help desk guy could set it up. So with all that said, do I still need to hire vExperts and VCDX pros to build out my virtualization infrastructure? It would appear not. Is that the message VMware is trying to convey here?
  • One SKU for the Win: I can’t be the only one that thinks buying the VMware stack is a complicated & time-consuming affair. Chris Wahl points out that EVO:RAIL is one SKU, one invoice, one price to pay, and VMware’s product page confirms that, saying you can buy a Dell EVO:RAIL or a Fujitsu EVO:RAIL, but whatever you buy, it’ll be one SKU. This is really nice. But why? VMware is famous for licensing its best-in-class features…why mess with something that’s worked so well for them?
    Shades of Azure simplicity here
    Shades of Azure simplicity here

    One could argue that EVO:RAIL is a reaction to simplified pricing structures on rival systems…let’s be honest with ourselves. What’s more complicated: buying a full vSphere and/or vHorizon suite for a new four node cluster, or purchasing the equivalent amount of computing units in Azure/AWS/Google Compute? What model is faster to deploy, from sales call to purchasing to receiving to service? What model probably requires consulting help?

    Don’t get me wrong, I think it’s great. I like simple menus, and whereas buying VMware stuff before was like choosing from a complicated, multi-page, multi-entree menu, now it’s like buying burgers at In ‘n Out. That’s very cool, but it means something has changed in vLand.

  • I love the density: As someone who’s putting the finishing touches on my own new virtualization infrastructure, I love the density in EVO:RAIL. 2 Rack Units with E5-26xx class Xeons packing 6 cores each means you can pack about 48 cores into 2U! Not bad, not bad at all. The product page also says you can have up to 16TB of stroage in those same 2U (courtesy of VSAN) and while you still need a ToR switch to jack into, each node has 2x10GbE SFP+ or Copper. Which is excellent. RAM is the only thing that’s a bit constrained; each node in an EVO:RAIL can only hold 192GB of RAM, a total of 768GB per EVO:RAIL.In comparison, my beloved 2U pizza boxes offer more density in some places, but less overall, given than 1 Pizza Box = one node. In the Supermicros I’m racking up later this week, I can match the core count (4×12 Core E5-46xx), improve upon the RAM (up to 1TB per node) and easily surpass the 16TB of storage. That’s all in 2U and all for about $15-18k.Where the EVO:RAIL appears to really shine is in VM/VDI density. VMware claims a single EVO:RAIL is built to support 100 General Purpose VMs or to support up to 250 VDI sessions, which is f*(*U#$ outstanding.
  • I wonder if I can run Hyper-V on that: Of course I thought that. Because that would really kick ass if I could.

Overall, a mighty impressive showing from VMware this week. Like my VMware colleagues, I pine for an EVO:RAIL in my lab.

I think EVO:RAIL points to something bigger though…This product marks a shift in VMware’s thinking, a strategic reaction to the changes in the marketplace. This is not just a play against Nutranix and other hyper-converged vendors, but against the simplicity and non-specialist nature of cloud Infrastructure as a Service.  This is a play against complexity in other words…this is VMware telling the marketplace that you can have best-in-class virtualization without worst-in-class licensing pain and without hiring vExperts to help you deploy it.

Tales from the Hot Lane

A few brief updates & random thoughts from the last few days on all the stuff I’ve been working on.

Refreshing the Core at work: Summer’s ending, but at work, a new season is advancing, one rack unit at a time. I am gradually racking up & configuring new compute, storage, and network as it arrives; It Is Not About the Hardware™, but since you were wondering: 64 Ivy Bridge cores and about 512GB RAM, 30TB of storage, and Nexus 3k switching.

Cisco_logoAhh, the Nexus line. Never had the privilege to work on such fine switching infrastructure. Long time admirer, first-time NX-OS user. I have a pair of them plus a Layer 3 license so the long-term thinking involves not just connecting my compute to my storage, but connecting this dense stack northbound & out via OSPF or static routes over a fault-tolerant HSRP or VRRP config.

To do that, I need to get familiar with some Nexus-flavored acronyms that aren’t familiar to me: virtual port channels (VPC), Control Plane policy (COPP), VRF, and oh-so-many-more. I’ll also be attempting to answer the question once and for all: what spanning tree mode does one use to connect a Nexus switch to a virtualization host running Hyper-V’s converged switching architecture? I’ve used portfast in the lab on my Catalyst, but the lab switch is five years old, whereas this Nexus is brand new. And portfast never struck me as the right answer, just the easy one.

To answer those questions and more, I have TAC and this excellent tome provided gratis by the awesome VAR who sold us much of the equipment.

Into the vCPU Blender goes Lync: Last Friday, I got a call from my former boss & friend who now heads up a fast-growing IT department on the coast. He’s been busy refreshing & rationalizing much of his infrastructure as well, but as is typical for him, he wants more. He wants total IT transformation, so as he’s built out his infrastructure, he laid the groundwork to go 100% Microsoft Lync 2013 for voice.

Yeah baby. Lync 2013 as your PBX, delivering dial tone to your endpoints, whether they are Bluetooth-connected PC headsets, desk phones, or apps on a mobile.

Forget software-defined networking. This is software-defined voice & video, with no special server hardware, cloud services, or any other the other typical expensive nonsense you’d see in a VoIP implementation.

If Lync 2013 as PBX is not on your IT Bucket List, it should be. It was something my former boss & I never managed to accomplish at our previous employer on Hyper-V.

Now he was doing it alone. On a fast VMware/Nexus/NetApp stack with distributed vSwitches. And he wanted to run something by me.

So you can imagine how pleased I was to have a chat with him about it.

He was facing one problem which threatened his Go Live date: Mean Opinion Score, or MOS, a simple 0-5 score Lync provides to its administrators that summarizes call quality. MOS is a subset of a hugely detailed Media Quality Summary Report, detailed here at TechNet.

thMy friend was scoring a .6 on his MOS. He wanted it to be at 4 or above prior to go-live.

So at first we suspected QoS tags were being stripped somewhere between his endpoint device and the Lync Mediation VM. Sure enough, Wireshark proved that out; a Distributed vSwitch (or was it a Nexus?) wasn’t respecting the tag, resulting in a sort of half-duplex QoS if you will.

He fixed that, ran the test again, and still: .6. Yikes! Two days to go live. He called again.

That’s when I remembered the last time we tried to tackle this together. You see, the Lync Mediation Server is sort of the real PBX component in Lync Enterprise Voice architecture. It handles signalling to your endpoints, interfaces with the PSTN or a SIP trunk, and is the one server workload that, even in 2014, I’d hesitate making virtual.

My boss had three of them. All VMs on three different VMware hosts across two sites.

I dug up a Microsoft whitepaper on virtualizing Lync, something we didn’t have the last time we tried this. While Redmond says Lync Enterprise Voice on top of VMs can work, it’s damned expensive from a virtualization host perspective. MS advises:

  • You should disable hyperthreading on all hosts.
  • Do not use processor oversubscription; maintain a 1:1 ratio of virtual CPU to physical CPU.
  • Make sure your host servers support nested page tables (NPT) and extended page tables (EPT).
  • Disable non-uniform memory access (NUMA) spanning on the hypervisor, as this can reduce guest performance.

Talk about Harshing your vBuzz. Essentially, building Lync out virtually with Enterprise Voice forces you to go sparse on your hosts, which is akin to buying physical servers for Lync. If you don’t, into the vCPU blender goes Lync, and out comes poor voice quality, angry users, bitterness, regret and self-punishment.

Anyway, he did as advised, put some additional vCPU & memory reservations in place on his hosts, and yesterday, whilst I was toiling in the Hot Lane, he called me from Lync via his mobile.

He’s a married man just like me, but I must say his voice sounded damn sexy as it was sliced up into packets, sent over the wire, and converted back to analog on my mobile’s speaker. A virtual chest bump over the phone was next, then we said goodbye.

Another Go Live Victory (by proxy). Sweet.

Azure Outage: Yesterday’s bruising hours-long global Azure outage affected Virtual Machines, storage blobs, web services, database services and HD Insight, Microsoft’s service for big data crunching. As it unfolded, I navel-gazed, when I felt like helping. There was literally nothing I could do. Had I some crucial IaaS or PaaS in the Azure stack, I’d be shit out of luck, just like the rest. I felt quite helpless; refreshing Mary Jo’s pageyellow-exclamation-mark-in-triangle-md and the Azure dashboard didn’t help. I wondered what the problem was; it’s been a difficult week for Microsofties whether on-prem or in Azure. Had to be related to the update cycle, I thought.

On the plus side, Azure Active Directory services never went down, nor did several other services. Office 365 stayed up as well, though it is built atop separate-but-related infrastructure in my understanding.

Lastly, I pondered two thoughts: if you’re thinking of reducing your OpEx by replacing your DR strategy with an Azure Site Recovery strategy, does this change your mind? And if you’re building out Azure as your primary IaaS or PaaS, do you just accept such outages or do you plan a failback strategy?

Labworks : Towards a 100% Windows-defined Daisetta Lab: What’s next for the Daisetta Lab? Well, I have me an AMD Duron CPU, a suitable motherboard, a 1U enclosure with PSU, and three Keepin’ it RealTek NICs. Oh, I also have a case of the envies, envies for the VMware crowd and their VXLAN and NSX and of course VMworld next week. So I’m thinking of building a Network Virtualization Gateway appliance. For those keeping score at home, that would mean from Storage to Compute to Network Edge, I’d have a 100% Windows lab environment, infused with NVGRE which has more use cases than just multi-tenancy as I had thought.